💰 Theory of Blackjack : Peter A. Griffin :

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Peter Griffin, who called himself a simple algebra teacher but had such a winning way with numbers that he unlocked the mathematics of.


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Theory of Blackjack by Peter A. Griffin, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.


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Generally considered the bible for serious blackjack players, Peter Griffin's classic work provides insight into the methods and numbers behind.


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The Theory of Blackjack: The Complete Card Counter's Guide to the Casino: Griffin, Peter: anariel-cats.ru: Books.


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To professor Peter A. Griffin's credit, he really makes it clear what type of book it is early on in the book: theoretical & won't make you a better blackjack.


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Generally considered the bible for serious blackjack players, Peter Griffin's classic work provides insight into the methods and numbers behind.


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Peter Griffin, who called himself a simple algebra teacher but had such a winning way with numbers that he unlocked the mathematics of.


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the theory of blackjack by peter griffin

I find little solace in this view that Nevada's country bumpkins are less trustworthy but more dextrous than their big city cousins. My playing career has had a sort of a Faustian aspect to it, as I began to explore the mysteries of the game I began to lose, and the deeper I delved, the more I lost. To extend G. The best cheats, I assume, have no mannerisms.{/INSERTKEYS}{/PARAGRAPH} The gar- gantuan simulation results of my colleague Professor John Gwynn of the Computer Science Department at California State University, Sacramento were by far the most significant presentation from a practical standpoint and motivated me to adjust upwards the figures on pages 28 and 30, reflecting gain from computer-optimal strategy varia- tion. I must, I fear, like Marx, relegate myself to the role of theoretician rather than active revolutionary. What determin- ed a system's effectiveness anyway? Not long ago a Newsweek magazine article described Kirk Kerkorian as "an expert crapshooter. The next day, in Tonopah, I proceeded to top this gaffe by standing with 5,4 against the dealer's six showing; my train of thought here had been satisfaction when I first picked up the hand because I remembered what the basic strategy called for. Thanks are due to: many individuals among whom John Ferguson, Alan Griffin, and Ben Mulkey come to mind whose conver- sations helped expand my imagination on the subject; John Christopher, whose proofreading prevented many ambigui- ties and errors; and, finally, readers Wong, Schlesinger, Bernhardt, Gwynn, French, Wright, Early, and especially the eagle-eyed Speer for pointing out mistakes in the earlier editions. But after renewing my faith by confirming. Cheating No book on blackjack seems complete without either a warning about, or whitewashing of, the possibility of being cheated. Difficulty interpreting Randomness My original attitude of disapproval towards gambling has been mitigated somewhat over the years by a growing ap- preciation of the possible therapeutic benefits from the intense absorption which overcomes the bettor when awmting the ver- dict of. Epstein's Theory of Gambling and Statistical Logic, had come to my attention, but to adequately lead the discussion of our supplementary reading, Dostoyevsky's The Gambler, I clearly had to share this experience. I lost thirteen hands in a row to a dealer before I realized she was deliberately interlacing the cards in a high low stack. The best card counter can hardly expect to have more than a two percent advantage over the house; hence if he's cheated more than one hand out of fifty he'll be a loser. For me this removes the element of human challenge. In this chapter the game of baccarat makes an unexpected appearance, as a foil to contrast with blackj ack. No, it wasn't a knowledgeable card counting play, just a begin- ner's mistake, for I was still struggling to learn the basic strategy as well as fathom the ambiguities of the ace in "soft" and "hard" hands. This chapter concludes with two sections on the increasingly popular topic of risk minimization. Only minutes later a triple split of three nines was executed, produc- ing an expectation of -. Soon, indeed, I had recouped my losses and was playing with their money, but it wasn't long before the pendulum swung the other way again. Nevertheless, while we can afford to be a bit more sympathetic to those who futilely try to impose a system on dice, keno, or roulette, we should not be less impatient in urging them to turn their attention to the dependent trials of blackjack. The Appendix to Chapter One will consist of a bibliography of all books or articles referred to later. The only interest I'd have in this machine a very good approxima- tion to which could be built with the information in Chapter Six of this book is in using it as a measuring rod to compare how well I or others could play the game. Lady Luck. This book will not teach you how to play blackjack; I assume you already know how. However, you are justified in being reluctant to accept this conclusion since the objectivity of the experimenter can be called into question; I produced evidence to explain my own long losing streak as being the result of foul play, rather than my own incompetence. At the time, I was preparing to give a course in The Mathematics of Gambling which a group of upper division math majors had petitioned to have offere4. What the text informed me was that, short of armed robbery or counterfeiting chips and I had considered these , there was only one way to get my money back. Much to the amusement of a local Indian and an old cowboy I doubled down on A,9 and lost. Thus advised, they will then be able to skim over the formulas and derivations which mean lit- tle to them and still profit quite a bit from some comments and material which just seemed to fit more naturally in the Appen- dices. Although this book should prove interesting to those who hope to profit from casino blackjack, I can offer them no encouragement, for today I find myself far- ther behind in the game than I was after my original odyssey in I live in dread that I may never again be able to even the score, since it may not be possible to beat the hand held game and four decks bore me to tears. Individuals who don't possess an acquaintance with Thorp's Beat The Dealer, Wilson's Casino Gambler's Guide, or Epstein's Theory of Gambling and Statistical Logic will probably find it inadvisable to begin their serious study of the mathematics of blackjack here. An investigator for the Nevada Gaming Commission ad- mitted point blank at the U. A fuller explication of how to approximate gambler's ruin probabilities for blackjack now appears in the Appendix to Chapter Nine. As I mentioned earlier, I had been moderately successful playing until the "pendulum swung. It is appropriate here to acknowledge the valuable assistance I have received in writing this book. Con- trary to original fears there was only an insignificant release of energy, and when the smoke had cleared I discovered that splitting exactly two nines against a nine yielded an expecta- tion of precisely -. Revised Edition On November 29, , at PM, just after the first edi- tion of this book went to press, the pair was split for the first time under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. Readers interested in baccarat will be rewarded with the absolutely most powerful card counting methods available for that game. I'll recite only the obvious cases which don't require proof. How good were the ex- isting systems? It took me an inordinately long time to realize this when I was pondering how to find the appropriate index for insurance with the Dubner HiLo system. Shaw's insight: If you can do something, then you do it; if you can't, you teach others to do it; if you can't teach, you teach people to teach; and if you can't do that, you administrate. More than once when the computer rejected or otherwise played havoc with one of my programs he counseled me to look for a logical error rather than to persist in my demand that an elec- trician be called in to check the supply of electrons for purity. However, I recognize that the readers will have diverse backgrounds and accordingly I have divided each chapter into two parts, a main body and a subsequent, parallel, "mathematical appendix. Different sections of the Appendices are lettered for con- venience and follow the development within the chapter itself. An excellent mathematical text, R. Perhaps, like Stendahl, "I prefer the pleasure of writing all sorts of foolishness to that of wearing an embroidered coat 2 costing francs. I'll begin my comments with the frank admission that I am completely incapable of detecting the dealing of a second, either by sight or by sound. Loose ends are tied together in Chapter Fourteen where questions which have arisen in the past few years are answered. Blackjack's Uniqueness This is because blackjack is unique among all casino games in that it is a game in which skill should make a dif- ference, even-swing the odds in the player's favor. A brand new Chapter Twelve has been writ- ten to bring the book up to date with my participation in the Fifth National Conference on Gambling. I had a dealer shuffle up twice during a hand, both times with more than twenty unplayed cards, because she could tell that the card she just brought off the deck would have helped me: "Last card" she said with a quick turn of the wrist to destroy the evidence. Albert Einstein once said "everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler. These will be found at the end of the book. Rosenbaum I played my first blackjack in January, , at a small club in Yerington, Nevada. One of the overlooked motivations for a dealer to cheat is not financial at all, but psychological. I say I know I've been cheated. Could they be measureably improved, and if so, how? Although computers are a sine qua non for carrying out lengthy blackjack calculations, I am not as infatuated by them as many of my colleagues in education. The dealer is compelled by the rules to function like an automaton and may be inclined, either out of resentment toward someone the card counter do- ing something of which he's incapable or out of just plain boredom, to substitute his own determination for that of fate. {PARAGRAPH}{INSERTKEYS}No part of this publication may be translated, reproduced, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the expressed written permission of the copyright owner. I must have gotten tired of waiting for the dealer to get around to me at the crowded table since, after the dealer made 17 and turned over my cards, there, much to everyone's surprise, was my pristine total of nine! To him lowe a great debt for his patient and priceless help in teaching me how to master the machine myself. Long since disabused of the notion that I can win a fortune in the game, my lingering addiction is to the pursuit of solutions to the myriad of mathematical questions posed by this intriguing game. To this view I raise the anachronistic objec- tion that one good Jesuit in our schools will accomplish more than a hundred new computer terminals. Following several months of wasted bumbling I finally realized that the dealer's conditional probability of blackjack could be calculated for each value of the HiLo index by simple enumerative techniques. Why did various count strategies differ occasionally in their recommendations on how to play some hands? It's quite fashionable these days to orient almost every course toward adaptability to the computer. For the intrepid soul who disregards my warning and insists on plowing forward without the slightest knowledge of blackj ack at all, I have included two Supplements, the first to acquaint him with the rules, practices, and terminol- ogy of the game and the second to explain the fundamental principles and techniques of card counting. My own contribution to the conference, a study of the nature of the relation between the actual opportunity occur- ring as the blackjack deck is depleted and the approxima- tion provided by an ultimate point count, becomes a new Chapter Thirteen. Why then should I presume to write a book on this sub- ject? Perhaps most importantly, the strategy tables of Chapter Six are modified for use in any number of decks. Indeed, I often suspect that many dealers who can't cheat like to suggest they're in control of the game by cultivation of what they imagine are the mannerisms of a card-sharp. Indeed, is there anyone who, with a wager at stake, can avoid the trap of trying to perceive patterns when confronting randomness, of seeking "purpose where there is only process? Some will also enjoy the game for its solitaire-like aspect; since the dealer has no choices it's like batting a ball against a wall; there is no oppo- nent and the collisions of ego which seem to characterize so many games of skill, like bridge and chess, do not occur. After this first problem, my interest became more general. In education the means is the end; how facts and calculations are produced by our students is more important than how many or how precise they are. Why This Book? Fascinated by Buck Rogers gadgetry, they look forward to wiring themselves up like bombs and stealthily plying their trade under the very noses of the casino personnel, fueled by hidden power sources. But I do have a knowledge of the theoretical probabilities to share with those who are in- terested; unfortunately my experience offers no assurance that these will be realized, in the short or the long run. My colleague, Professor John Christopher, wrote a computer program which provided the answer and also introduced me to the calculating power of the device. Indeed one of the virtues I've found in not possessing such a contraption, from which answers come back at the press of a button, is that, by having to struggle for and check approximations, I've developed in- sights which I otherwise might not have achieved. My emotions have run the gamut from the inebriated ela- tion following a big win which induced me to pound out a chorus of celebration on the top of an occupied Reno police car to the frustrated depths of biting a hole through a card after picking up what seemed my 23rd consecutive stiff hand against the dealer's ten up card. Then she either didn't or did have blackjack depending it seems, on whether they did or didn't insure; unfortunately the last time when she turned over her blackjack there was also a four hiding underneath with the ten! In addition the Chapter Eight analysis of Double Exposure has been altered to reflect rule changes which have occurred since the original material was written. But now I had an obligation to know first hand about the subject I was going to teach. Development of an exact, composition dependent strategy mechanism as well as an exact, repeated pair splitting algorithm now enables me to update material in Chapters Six, Eight, and, particularly, Eleven where I present correct basic strategy recommendations for any number of decks and dif- ferent combinations of rules. There was even a time when I wondered if Messrs. When cited in subsequent chapters only the author's last name will be mentioned, unless this leads to ambiguity. Nevertheless I know I have been cheated on some occasions and find myself wondering just how often it takes place. Use of Computers Ultimately, all mathematical problems related to card counting are Bayesian; they involve conditional probabilities subject to information provided by a card counting parameter. The result of my sample, that the dealers had tens or aces out of hands played, was a statistically significant indication of some sort of legerde- main. Another time I drew with a total of thirteen against the dealer's three; I thought I'd busted until I realized the dealer had delivered two cards to me: the King that broke me and, underneath it, the eight she was clumsily trying to hold back for herself since it probably would fit so well with her three. This is because I envision my book as an extension, rather than a repetition, of these excellent works. I am also left wondering about the responsibility of the Gaming Commission since, if they knew the allegation was true why didn't they close the places, and if they didn't, why would their representative have made such a statement?